When two motivations race: The effects of time-saving bias and sensation-seeking on driving speed choices

Eyal Peer, Tove Rosenbloom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Time-saving bias - people's biased judgments in estimating the time saved when increasing speed - has been found to strongly impact driving speed choices. However, this bias may be relevant only when the driver's motivation for increasing speed is to arrive sooner. If, on the other hand, the driver is motivated by the desire to experience thrill and sensation, a driver's level of sensation-seeking might better explain choices of speed. In this study, participants were asked to estimate the journey time when increasing speed and to estimate the speed required to arrive on time. They also indicated the speed they would personally choose in such a situation. Next, participants filled out Zuckerman's (1994) Sensation Seeking Scale. Results showed that both time-saving estimations and the Disinhibition scale of Sensation Seeking (as well as drivers' gender) contributed independently and additively to drivers' choice of speed and that time-saving bias' role was somewhat stronger than sensation-seeking.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1135-1139
Number of pages5
JournalAccident Analysis and Prevention
Volume50
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

Keywords

  • Sensation seeking
  • Speeding
  • Time-saving bias

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'When two motivations race: The effects of time-saving bias and sensation-seeking on driving speed choices'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this