What do patients want? Surgical informed-consent and patient-centered care – An augmented model of information disclosure

Gillie Gabay, Yaarit Bokek-Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The ideal moral standard for surgical informed-consent calls upon surgeons to carry out a disclosure dialogue with patients so they have as full as possible an understanding of the procedure before they sign the informed-consent form. This study is the first to empirically explore patient preferences regarding disclosure dialogue. Twelve Israelis who underwent life-saving surgeries participated in a narrative study. Three themes emerged from the analysis: objectification of patients, anxiety provoking processes and information, and lack of information that was essential for patients. Findings contribute to existing debates among surgeons regarding the scope and importance of some disclosure components. Analysis led to our formulation of an augmented subjective model of information disclosure that participants prefer, which extends beyond the immediate present of the surgery to the period after discharge, and until return to routine. Surgeons should be aware of patient preferences in disclosure, and gaps between perceptions of surgeons, and preferences and needs of patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)467-477
Number of pages11
JournalBioethics
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2020
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Keywords

  • disclosure-model
  • informed consent dialogue
  • patient-centered care
  • right to autonomy
  • surgical informed-consent

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