What Contributes to Word Learning and Story Retelling of Arabic-speaking Children? Investigation of an E-book Reading Intervention

Ofra Korat, Nareman Mahamid, Safieh Hassunah Arafat, Carmit Altman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Learning words in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and story retelling was tested using an e-book with dictionary. One hundred and sixty-three Arabic-speaking kindergartners were randomly divided into 5 groups. The experimental groups read the e-book with a dictionary: (1) with a dynamic illustration and a request to vocalize the word; (2) with a dynamic illustration without a request to vocalize the word; (3) with a static illustration and a request to vocalize the word; (4) with a static illustration without a request for vocalization. The control group read the book without a dictionary. Receptive and expressive meaning of the e-book’s words and story retelling skills were tested pre- and post-intervention. Children who read the e-book with a dictionary with dynamic presentation of target words and repeated vocalization of the words showed improvement in target words meaning and story retelling. Children with a lower initial level progressed more. Educational implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)158-176
Number of pages19
JournalLiteracy Research and Instruction
Volume61
Issue number2
Early online date5 Jul 2021
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers.

Keywords

  • Comprehension
  • early/emergent literacy
  • technology
  • vocabulary

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