Using SARS-CoV-2 anti-S IgG levels as a marker of previous infection: example from an Israeli healthcare worker cohort.

Kamal Abu Jabal, Michael Edelstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Determining COVID-19 status is important for global epidemiology and individual-level vaccination decision-making. SARS-CoV-2 infection can generally only be detected during a 7–10-day period using polymerase chain reaction or rapid antigen testing, and infection-specific antinucleocapsid IgG assays are not universally available. We determined whether SARS-CoV-2 antispike (anti-S) IgG levels could discriminate between vaccination and previous infection when interpreted alongside vaccination timing. Methods: We measured SARS-CoV-2 anti-S-IgG level in 535 vaccinated Israeli healthcare workers with known previous infection status 6–8 months after the second dose. Results: Anti-S IgG levels above 1000 AU/ml at that time point was 93.3% predictive of infection in the previous 3 months, whereas the negative predictive value for infection in the past 3 months of a level below that threshold was 99.5%. Conclusion: When interpreted alongside vaccination timing, anti-S serological assays can confirm or exclude previous infections within the previous 3 months.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-24
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Journal of Infectious Diseases
Volume120
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Author(s)

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • public health
  • serology
  • testing

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