Two-year-olds' recognition of hierarchies: Evidence from their interpretation of the semantic relation between object labels

G. Diesendruck, M. Shatz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

under various conditions the relative frequency with which children interpreted novel and familiar labels for objects as mutually exclusive. Two-year-olds were taught novel labels in one of three ways: (a) inclusive input: “[novel label] is a kind of [familiar label]”; (b) exclusive input: “[novel label] is not a [familiar label]”; or (c) (Study 2) no relational input. The referents of the novel and familiar labels were taxonomically either: (a) strongly related (e.g., a fighter airplane and a passenger airplane), or (b) weakly related (e.g., a paint brush and a toothbrush). Children were less likely to interpret the labels as picking out mutually exclusive categories when: (a) the labels were introduced with the inclusive input; and (b) the referents of the labels were taxonomically strongly related. This modulation of mutual exclusivity interpretations in response to the various hierarchical relations instantiated in the stimuli and input provides evidence for 2-year-olds' emerging capacity to recognize hierarchical relations.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)577-594
JournalCognitive Development
Volume16
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Two-year-olds' recognition of hierarchies: Evidence from their interpretation of the semantic relation between object labels'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this