The role of singing familiar songs in encouraging conversation among people with middle to late stage alzheimer's disease

Ayelet Dassa, Dorit Amir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

57 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Language deficits in people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) manifest, among other things, in a gradual deterioration of spontaneous speech. People with AD tend to speak less as the disease progresses and their speech becomes confused. However, the ability to sing old tunes sometimes remains intact throughout the disease. Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the role of singing familiar songs in encouraging conversation among people with middle to late stage AD. Methods: Six participants attended group music therapy sessions over a one-month period. Using content analysis, we qualitatively examined transcriptions of verbal and sung content during 8 group sessions for the purpose of understanding the relationship between specific songs and conversations that occurred during and following group singing. Results: Content analysis revealed that songs from the participants' past-elicited memories, especially songs related to their social and national identity. Analyses also indicated that conversation related to the singing was extensive and the act of group singing encouraged spontaneous responses. After singing, group members expressed positive feelings, a sense of accomplishment, and belonging. Conclusions: Carefully selecting music from the participants' past can encourage conversation. Considering the failure in spontaneous speech in people with middle to late stage AD, it is important to emphasize that group members' responses to each other occurred spontaneously without the researcher's encouragement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-153
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Music Therapy
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2014

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This paper is based on a PhD dissertation conducted at Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel. The study was supported by the Paulina and Hans Graubard grant, a grant from the Myers-JDC-Brookdale Institute of Gerontology and Human Developments, and ESHEL – The Association for the Planning and Development of Services for the Aged in Israel. I would like to thank the management and staff at the Stuchinski Alzheimer Research & Treatment Center in Ramat Gan, Israel, who gave their full and consistent support throughout this study.

Keywords

  • AD
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • conversation
  • familiar songs

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The role of singing familiar songs in encouraging conversation among people with middle to late stage alzheimer's disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this