The Relationship between Psychological Capital, Coping with Stress, Well-Being, and Performance

Edna Rabenu, Eyal Yaniv, Dov Elizur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

98 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined coping with stress from an organizational perspective by positing a relationship between Psychological Capital (PsyCap) and coping strategies (defined as change, accepting, or withdrawal). It was hypothesized that coping strategies would mediate the relationship between PsyCap and people’s well-being and performance. Questionnaire findings from a five hundred and fifty four employees showed a significant relationship between PsyCap and coping. Coping strategy in terms of change partially mediated the relationship between PsyCap and the outcomes of well-being and performance. Coping strategy in terms of withdrawal partially mediated the relationship between PsyCap and performance. PsyCap was found to have a strong, positive, and direct correlation with well-being and performance. Well-being was not found to associate significantly with performance. These findings suggest that the central variable in the model is not coping but PsyCap. PsyCap appears to have a strong, direct, and significant effect on the dependent variables. The theoretical implications are examined and future research avenues suggested.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)875-887
Number of pages13
JournalCurrent Psychology
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York.

Keywords

  • Positive psychological capital
  • Strategies of coping with stress
  • Well-being
  • performance

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