The neurobiology of hatred: Tools of Dialogue© intervention for youth reared amidst intractable conflict impacts brain, behaviour, and peacebuilding attitudes

Ruth Feldman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Myths, drama, and sacred texts have warned against the fragile nature of human love; the closer the affiliative bond, the quicker it can turn into hatred, suggesting similarities in the neurobiological underpinnings of love and hatred. Here, I offer a theoretical account on the neurobiology of hatred based on our model on the biology of human attachments and its three foundations; the oxytocin system, the “affiliative brain”, comprising the neural network sustaining attachment, and biobehavioural synchrony, the process by which humans create a coupled biology through coordinated action. These systems mature in mammals in the context of the mother–infant bond and then transfer to support life within social groups. During this transition, they partition to support affiliation and solidarity to one's group and fear and hatred towards out-group based on minor variations in social behaviour.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)603-616
Number of pages14
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
Volume112
Issue number4
Early online date19 Jan 2023
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2023
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 The Author. Acta Paediatrica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

Keywords

  • attachment
  • empathy
  • hatred
  • inter-group conflct
  • intervention
  • oxytocin
  • social neuroscience

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