The link between perceptions of self and of social relationships in high-functioning children with autism

Nirit Bauminger, Cory Shulman, Galit Agam

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    89 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    This study examined the perception of friendship in high-functioning children with autism (8-17 years old) and the link between perceptions of self and of social relationships in these children. Sixteen typically developing children were matched to sixteen high-functioning children with autism, on chronological age, IQ, gender, and mother's education. Study measures included a friendship picture recognition task and three self-report questionnaires: qualities of friendship, loneliness, and self-perception profile. Main results indicated that even if children with autism more frequently related to the intersubjective qualities of friendship such as affective sharing or intimacy, they perceived their friendship to be as close as did typically developing children. Also, for the group with autism, friendship correlated positively with cognitive competencies and general self-worth and negatively with loneliness. In addition, children with autism perceived their social and athletic competencies as lower compared with typically developing children. Implications of the associations between self-perceptions and perceptions of friendship are discussed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)193-214
    Number of pages22
    JournalJournal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities
    Volume16
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 2004

    Bibliographical note

    Funding Information:
    This research was supported by a Bar-Ilan University Internal Grant, given to the first author. The authors would like to express their appreciation to Dee B. Ankonina for her editorial contribution. Special thanks are extended to the children who participated in the study.

    Keywords

    • Friendship
    • High-functioning children with autism
    • Loneliness
    • Self perception

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'The link between perceptions of self and of social relationships in high-functioning children with autism'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this