The human skin/chick chorioallantoic membrane model accurately predicts the potency of cosmetic allergens

Dan Slodownik, Igor Grinberg, Ram M. Spira, Yehuda Skornik, Ronald S. Goldstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current standard method for predicting contact allergenicity is the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). Public objection to the use of animals in testing of cosmetics makes the development of a system that does not use sentient animals highly desirable. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of the chick egg has been extensively used for the growth of normal and transformed mammalian tissues. The CAM is not innervated, and embryos are sacrificed before the development of pain perception. The aim of this study was to determine whether the sensitization phase of contact dermatitis to known cosmetic allergens can be quantified using CAM-engrafted human skin and how these results compare with published EC3 data obtained with the LLNA. We studied six common molecules used in allergen testing and quantified migration of epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) as a measure of their allergic potency. All agents with known allergic potential induced statistically significant migration of LC. The data obtained correlated well with published data for these allergens generated using the LLNA test. The human-skin CAM model therefore has great potential as an inexpensive, non-radioactive, in vivo alternative to the LLNA, which does not require the use of sentient animals. In addition, this system has the advantage of testing the allergic response of human, rather than animal skin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)409-413
Number of pages5
JournalExperimental Dermatology
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009

Keywords

  • Allergen testing
  • Contact allergy
  • Langerhans cells
  • Local lymph node assay
  • Xenografting

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