The historical coverage of televised media events in print media: The Case of the Eurovision Song Contest

Gilad Greenwald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study argues that, historically, televised media events managed to become prominent in the public agenda, not only through their live broadcast on television, but also through their long-term, continuous visibility in the print media. This, both on the level of the intensity of their press coverage; and also on the level of their framing as important and significant events for society. In other words, media events have enabled a content-based “coexistence” between print media and television. Through a thematic-qualitative analysis, the study describes how two Israeli, popular and elite newspapers promoted the public discourse on two of the most famous media events in Israel’s history: the 1979 and 1999 Eurovision Song Contests in Jerusalem. Findings reveal an intensive print media coverage of the two shows, from both “soft” (gossip) and “hard” (politics) perspectives. In addition, differences were found in the historical coverage of the contests in popular newspapers, compared to elite ones.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-50
Number of pages16
JournalCommunication and Society
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 3 Oct 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Communication & Society.

Keywords

  • Eurovision Song Contest
  • Media history
  • media events
  • media evolution
  • print media

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