The effects of mother-child mediated learning strategies on psychological resilience and cognitive modifiability of boys with learning disability

David Tzuriel, Vered Shomron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The theoretical framework of the current study is based on mediated learning experience (MLE) theory, which is similar to the scaffolding concept. The main question of the current study was to what extent mother–child MLE strategies affect psychological resilience and cognitive modifiability of boys with learning disability (LD). Secondary questions were to what extent the home environment, severity of boy's LD, and mother's attitude towards her child's LD affect her MLE strategies and consequently the child's psychological resilience and cognitive modifiability. Aims: The main objectives of this study were the following: (a) to investigate the effects of mother–child MLE strategies on psychological resilience and cognitive modifiability among 7- to 10-year-old boys with LD, (b) to study the causal effects of distal factors (i.e., socio-economic status [SES], home environment, severity of child's LD, mother's attitude towards LD) and proximal factors (i.e., MLE strategies) on psychological resilience and cognitive modifiability. Methods: A sample of mother–child dyads (n = 100) were videotaped during a short teaching interaction. All children were boys diagnosed as children with LD. The interaction was analysed for MLE strategies by the Observation of Mediation Interaction scale. Children were administered psychological resilience tests and their cognitive modifiability was measured by dynamic assessment using the Analogies subtest from the Cognitive Modifiability Battery. Home environment was rated by the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME), and mothers answered a questionnaire of attitudes towards child's LD. Results: The findings showed that mother–child MLE strategies, HOME, and socio-economic level contributed significantly to prediction of psychological resilience (78%) and cognitive modifiability (51%). Psychological resilience was positively correlated with cognitive modifiability (Rc = 0.67). Structural equation modelling analysis supported, in general, the hypotheses about the causal effects of distal and proximal factors of psychological resilience and cognitive modifiability. Conclusion: The findings validate and extend the MLE theory by showing that mother–child MLE strategies significantly predict psychological resilience and cognitive modifiability among boys with LD. Significant correlation between psychological resilience and cognitive modifiability calls for further research exploring the role of MLE strategies in development of both.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)236-260
Number of pages25
JournalBritish Journal of Educational Psychology
Volume88
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 The British Psychological Society

Keywords

  • Psychological resilience
  • cognitive modifiability
  • home environment
  • learning disability
  • mediated learning

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