The Conventional Nomenclatures for Notes and Intervals

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

If the cognitive octave (a, b) is set to (12, 7) and privileged status is bestowed upon the “natural core”—the set of seven notes (0, 0), (2, 1), (4, 2), (5, 3), (7, 4), (9, 5), and (11, 6)—then the conventional nomenclature for notes (for example, “E double-flat”) may be accounted for. Similarly, if privileged status is bestowed upon the “usual primary intervals”—the set of eleven note intervals (0, 0), (1, 1), (2, 1), (3, 2), (4, 2), (5, 3), (7, 4), (8, 5), (9, 5), (10, 6), and (11, 6)—then the conventional nomenclature for note intervals (for example, “descending triply-augmented fifth”), may be accounted for (Sect. 4.1). Staff-notational idiosyncrasies with regard to relative note height, interval direction, and register, are noted (Sect. 4.2).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationComputational Music Science
PublisherSpringer Nature
Pages59-65
Number of pages7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Publication series

NameComputational Music Science
ISSN (Print)1868-0305
ISSN (Electronic)1868-0313

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2013, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Keywords

  • Complex Object
  • Conventional Note
  • Note System
  • Register Minus
  • Transmission Function

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