The contribution of training and supervision to perceived role competence, secondary traumatization, and burnout among domestic violence therapists

Anat Ben-Porat, Haya Itzhaky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines differences between domestic violence therapists in Israel who had received specific training in the field and those who had not, with regard to the following variables: sense of role competence, secondary traumatization, and burnout. In addition, the study examines the correlation between the therapists' satisfaction with supervision on the one hand, and their sense of role competence, secondary traumatization, and burnout on the other. Participants included 143 social workers employed at centers for prevention of domestic violence and at battered women's shelters in Israel. The findings revealed no significant differences between the two groups of therapists in levels of burnout and secondary traumatization. However, significant differences between the two groups were found with regard to their sense of role competence in task knowledge/problem solving. Regarding satisfaction with supervision, no significant correlation was found with secondary traumatization and burnout. At the same time, a significant positive correlation was found between satisfaction with supervision and two components of role competence: task knowledge/problem solving and general competence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-108
Number of pages14
JournalThe Clinical Supervisor
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Supported by the Schnitzer Foundation for Research on the Israeli Economy and Society. Address correspondence to Anat Ben-Porat, School of Social Work, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900, Israel. E-mail: anatbenpo@gmail.com

Keywords

  • Burnout
  • Domestic violence
  • Professional training
  • Role competence
  • Secondary traumatization
  • Supervision

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