The contribution of driving with friends to young drivers’ intention to take risks: An expansion of the theory of planned behavior

Noga Guggenheim, Orit Taubman – Ben-Ari, Elisheva Ben-Artzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Young drivers' reckless driving, especially among males, is a global phenomenon and a major cause of injury and death. The behavior of young people, including their driving norms, is influenced by the dominant social discourse in their age group. Thus, the nature of the interaction between young drivers and their peers may contribute to increased or decreased risk exposure not only for everyone in the car, but also for other road users, and therefore warrants deeper examination. This study aims to shed light on driving with friends as a particular case of driving with peers. It was designed to examine the role of the four dimensions of the Safe Driving Climate among Friends (SDCaF) scale, in predicting young drivers’ intention to take risks behind the wheel, beyond the contribution of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). The sample consisted of 166 participants (70 men, 96 women), ranging in age from 17 to 24 years, who completed a set of self-report questionnaires. The findings demonstrate that the SDCaF dimensions, and especially perceived friends' pressure while driving, add to the explained variance in intention to engage in risky driving, beyond the variance explained by gender and the three components of the TPB. In addition to its theoretical expansion of the TPB model to include specific components relating to perceived driving with friends, the study's practical significance lies in directing efforts towards revealing pathways to reduce reckless driving among young people, through engaging their friends in the process.

Original languageEnglish
Article number105489
JournalAccident Analysis and Prevention
Volume139
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • Friends
  • Risky driving
  • Theory of planned behavior
  • Young drivers

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