The challenges of Ketef Hinnom: Using advanced technologies to reclaim the earliest biblical texts and their context

Gabriel Barkay, Marilyn J. Lundberg, Andrew G. Vaughn, Bruce Zuckerman, Kenneth Zuckerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The two paleo-Hebrew Ketef Hinnom inscriptions are famous for being our oldest biblical manuscripts. (Yet they contain even more readings than the famous priestly blessing of Numbers 6.) The present analysis provides the most reliable readings to date. They clarify two points of dispute: the date and nature of the artifacts. The authors support the thesis that these inscriptions constitute amulets with apotropaic functions and date them to the end of th eseventh or the beginning of the sixth century BCE. Just as important, readers will find here an inside look at how epigraphers use state of the art technology to bring new readings to light.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)162-171
Number of pages10
JournalNear Eastern Archaeology
Volume66
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

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