The Burden of Persuasion in Abstract Argumentation

Timotheus Kampik, Dov Gabbay, Giovanni Sartor

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper, we provide a formal framework for modeling the burden of persuasion in legal reasoning. The framework is based on abstract argumentation, a frequently studied method of non-monotonic reasoning, and can be applied to different argumentation semantics; it supports burdens of persuasion with arbitrary many levels, and allows for the placement of a burden of persuasion on any subset of an argumentation framework’s arguments. Our framework can be considered an extension of related works that raise questions on how burdens of persuasion should be handled in some conflict scenarios that can be modeled with abstract argumentation. An open source software implementation of the introduced formal notions is available as an extension of an argumentation reasoning library.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLogic and Argumentation - 4th International Conference, CLAR 2021, Proceedings
EditorsPietro Baroni, Christoph Benzmüller, Yì N. Wáng
PublisherSpringer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH
Pages224-243
Number of pages20
ISBN (Print)9783030893903
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021
Event4th International Conference on Logic and Argumentation, CLAR 2021 - Hangzhou, China
Duration: 20 Oct 202122 Oct 2021

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume13040 LNAI
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference4th International Conference on Logic and Argumentation, CLAR 2021
Country/TerritoryChina
CityHangzhou
Period20/10/2122/10/21

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

Keywords

  • Formal argumentation
  • Legal reasoning
  • Non-monotonic reasoning

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