Synthesis and biodegradation of arabinogalactan sponges prepared by reductive amination

T. Ehrenfreund-Kleinman, Z. Gazit, D. Gazit, T. Azzam, J. Golenser, A. J. Domb

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24 Scopus citations

Abstract

The synthesis of polysaccharide-based sponges for the use in tissue engineering was systematically investigated. A comparison study of the branched polysaccharide arabinogalactan (AG) and the linear polysaccharide dextran in the formation of sponges by the reaction with diamines or polyamines was conducted. Three AG-based sponges were synthesized from the crosslinking reaction with different amine molecules. The sponges obtained were highly porous, rapidly swelled in water, and were stable in vitro for at least 11 weeks in aqueous media at 37°C. AG-chitosan sponges were chosen as most suitable to serve as scaffolds for cell growth in tissue engineering. The biocompatibility in vivo of these sponges was evaluated by histological staining and non-invasive MRI technique after implantation in BALB/c mice. The sponge evoked an inflammatory response with vascularization of the implant. The inflammatory reaction decreased with time, indicating a healing process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4621-4631
Number of pages11
JournalBiomaterials
Volume23
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2002
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank the Canadian Faye Kaufman foundation for their generous support. We thank Dr. Ezra Rahamim from the Bletherman Center for Macromolecules at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem for his help with the scanning electron microscope. We thank Dr. Yoram Zilberman for his help with the MRI experiments. This work was supported in part by the US–Israel binational fund (BSF).

Funding

We thank the Canadian Faye Kaufman foundation for their generous support. We thank Dr. Ezra Rahamim from the Bletherman Center for Macromolecules at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem for his help with the scanning electron microscope. We thank Dr. Yoram Zilberman for his help with the MRI experiments. This work was supported in part by the US–Israel binational fund (BSF).

FundersFunder number
US–Israel Binational Fund
United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation

    Keywords

    • Arabinogalactan
    • Chitosan
    • Crosslinked gels
    • Tissue engineering

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