Surface composites: A novel method to fabricate adherent interfaces in thermal-mismatched systems

D. G. Lee, D. R. Gilbert, S. M. Lee, R. K. Singh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The utility of diamond as a wear-resistant coating has been severely limited by the inherent adhesion problems experienced in thermal expansion coefficient mismatched systems. Diamond's low thermal expansion coefficient relative to such materials as cemented carbides results in high residual stresses in the deposited film, which leads to poor adhesion characteristics. In this work, a novel process has been investigated for the formation of laser induced micro-rough surfaces on cemented carbide substrates. These surface structures have been used to produce diamond-coated cemented carbides (WC-6%Co) with compositionally graded interfaces, which are termed surface composites. Micro-Raman analysis of these structures showed significant modification of stress distribution within the deposited diamond film. Rockwell indentation testing of these structures showed concomitant improvement of film adhesion with increasing roughness of the interface.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)667-674
Number of pages8
JournalComposites Part B: Engineering
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1999
Externally publishedYes

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