Study of magnetic particles pulse-injected into an annular SPLITT-like channel inside a quadrupole magnetic field

Mauricio Hoyos, Lee R. Moore, Kara E. McCloskey, Shlomo Margel, Merav Zuberi, Jeffrey J. Chalmers, Maciej Zborowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

Advantages of the continuous magnetic flow sorting for biomedical applications over current, batch-wise magnetic separations include high throughput and a potential for scale-up operations. A continuous magnetic sorting process has been developed based on the quadrupole magnetic field centered on an annular flow channel. The performance of the sorter has been described using the conceptual framework of split-flow thin (SPLITT) fractionation, a derivative of field-flow fractionation (FFF). To eliminate the variability inherent in working with a heterogenous cell population, we developed a set of monodisperse magnetic microspheres of a characteristic magnetization, and a magnetophoretic mobility, similar to those of the cells labeled with a magnetic colloid. The theory of the magnetic sorting process has been tested by injecting a suspension of the magnetic beads into the carrier fluid flowing through the sorter and by comparing the theoretical and experimental recovery versus total flow-rate profiles. The position of the recovery maxima along the total flow-rate axis was a function of the average bead magnetophoretic mobility and the magnetic field intensity. The theory has correctly predicted the position of the peak maxima on the total flow-rate axis and the dependence on the bead mobility and the field intensity, but has not correctly predicted the peak heights. The differences between the calculated and the measured peak heights were a function of the total flow-rate through the system, indicating a fluid-mechanical origin of the deviations from the theory (such as expected of the lift force effects in the system). The well-controlled elution studies using the monodisperse magnetic beads, and the SPLITT theory, provided us with a firm basis for the future sorter evaluation using cell mixtures. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-116
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Chromatography A
Volume903
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Dec 2000

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by the grants from the NIH (R01 CA62349 to M.Z., R33 CA81662 to J.J.C. and M.Z.), the NSF (US–Israeli Binational Science Foundation 96-00486 to S.M. and M.Z., BES-9731059 to J.J.C.), and NATO (“Research and Development Grant” to M.H.). We thankfully acknowledge the technical assistance of Mr. Boris Kligman.

Funding

This study was supported by the grants from the NIH (R01 CA62349 to M.Z., R33 CA81662 to J.J.C. and M.Z.), the NSF (US–Israeli Binational Science Foundation 96-00486 to S.M. and M.Z., BES-9731059 to J.J.C.), and NATO (“Research and Development Grant” to M.H.). We thankfully acknowledge the technical assistance of Mr. Boris Kligman.

FundersFunder number
National Science Foundation
National Institutes of HealthR33 CA81662
National Cancer InstituteR01CA062349
North Atlantic Treaty Organization
United States-Israel Binational Science FoundationBES-9731059, 96-00486

    Keywords

    • Field-flow fractionation
    • Magnetic beads
    • Magnetic separation
    • Monodisperse microspheres
    • Pulse-injection
    • Quadrupole field
    • Split-flow thin fractionation

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