Spatial interactions in human vision: From near to far via experience-dependent cascades of connections

Uri Polat, Dov Sagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

216 Scopus citations

Abstract

Perceptual learning has been shown to affect early visual processes. Here, we show that learning induces an increase in the spatial range of lateral interactions. Using a lateral masking/facilitation paradigm and bandpass-localized stimuli, we measured the interaction range before and after extensive training on a threshold detection task. For naive observers, target threshold was found to be facilitated by mask presence at distances up to six times the target period. However, practice had the effect of increasing the facilitation range by at least a factor of three. We suggest that the induced longer-range facilitation is a result of internal response transmission via a cascade of local connections. The data presented also show that this chain can be broken. These results suggest a plasticity in early vision governed by Hebbian-like rules.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1206-1209
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume91
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Feb 1994
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Lateral masking
  • Learning
  • Long-range interactions
  • Plasticity
  • Short-range interactions

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