School safety interventions: Best practices and programs

Ron Avi Astor, Heather Ann Meyer, Rami Benbenishty, Roxana Marachi, Michelle Rosemond

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

71 Scopus citations

Abstract

An awareness of the empirical knowledge concerning school violence and programs that have been supported by research is essential for the successful adaptation of school violence prevention programs. Yet, knowledge of national trends and model programs is not sufficient. School social workers must also balance the importance of research-supported programs (which tend to be identically implemented) and "grassroots" involvement at the school level to create programs that fit the needs and intricacies of each school. The authors review some major trends and gaps concerning U.S. school violence, explore areas where school social workers could have a conceptual and practical impact, provide examples of multiple types of research-supported school safety programs, and present examples of monitoring and mapping approaches that address the need for grassroots involvement and strong empirical data.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-32
Number of pages16
JournalChildren and Schools
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2005
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Bullying and Bullying Victim Rates. Recently, the United States participated in a cross-national research project coordinated by the World Health Organization on the prevalence of bullying and victims of bullying on school grounds. This first U.S. representative sample consisted of students in grades 6 to 10. Nansel and colleagues (2001) found that 10.6 percent of the sample reported bullying others sometimes (moderate), and 8.8 percent admitted to bullying others frequently (once a week or more). Reports on victimization were slightly lower—8.5 percent of students reported being bullied sometimes and 8.4 percent once a week or more. About 30 percent of the sample reported

Funding

Bullying and Bullying Victim Rates. Recently, the United States participated in a cross-national research project coordinated by the World Health Organization on the prevalence of bullying and victims of bullying on school grounds. This first U.S. representative sample consisted of students in grades 6 to 10. Nansel and colleagues (2001) found that 10.6 percent of the sample reported bullying others sometimes (moderate), and 8.8 percent admitted to bullying others frequently (once a week or more). Reports on victimization were slightly lower—8.5 percent of students reported being bullied sometimes and 8.4 percent once a week or more. About 30 percent of the sample reported

FundersFunder number
World Health Organization
Shell United States

    Keywords

    • Interventions
    • Monitoring
    • Policy
    • Schools
    • Violence

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