Scholarly collaboration between Europe and Israel: A scientometric examination of a changing landscape

Eric Zimmerman, Wolfgang Glänzel, Judit Bar-Ilan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper we examine various aspects of the scientific collaboration between Europe and Israel, and show that the traditional collaboration patterns of Israel (preference towards collaboration with the US) is changing, and the collaboration with the EU countries is growing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)427-446
Number of pages20
JournalScientometrics
Volume78
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
On the other hand, we are witnessing an increasing interest by US states and universities (rather than by the Federal Government), countries such as Canada, India, Korea, China, Australia, and the European Union, in collaboration with Israeli scientists through matching funding arrangements (managed by the Ministry of Science <www.most.gov.il> and/or MATIMOP <www.matimop.org.il>). They realize not only the direct benefits of such collaboration (twice the research for every dollar invested, with this figure increasing with synergistic collaboration) but also the indirect ones such as the benefits derived from the sabbaticals spent by Israeli scientists (partially funded by the Israeli government) in their countries and regions, and more.

Funding Information:
For a long time – until the beginning of the 1990’s – the United States was the main foreign source for funding basic science research projects in Israel. Competition began in 1986 with the establishment of GIF, the German-Israeli Foundation for Scientific Research and Development, distributing money for joint German-Israeli research. Early Israeli-German scientific cooperation in life science and medicine was studied by GRANIT & PERITZ [1993]. At the same time there was a substantial growth in funding from the Israel Science Foundation from $4M to about $50M per year.

Funding Information:
Anecdotal evidence points to a decrease in federal funding levels vis-à-vis Israeli basic research. Some argue that this funding decrease, combined with Israeli’s entry into the European Union Research Framework Programme may signal a shift in Israel’s orientation away from The United States. Empirical evidence from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and Science Citation Index (SCI) (co-authorship trends) seem to support this (see Table 1). Europe will soon reach parity (if not surpass) the USA with regards to the funding of research and the joint conduct of science in Israel.

Funding Information:
Scientific and technological co-operation is a significant component defining relations between Israel and the European Union. Scientific co-operation between Israel and Europe has brought new opportunities for Israeli enterprises, research organisations and universities through sharing experience and access to EU markets. The FP7 is now the second largest funding agency for R&D in Israel, second only to the Israel Science Foundation.

Funding Information:
There is evidence of a decrease in USA federal funding levels vis-à-vis Israeli basic research. We argue that this funding decrease, combined with Israeli’s entry into the European Union Research Framework Programme signals a shift in Israel’s orientation away from The United States. Empirical evidence from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) based on co-authorship

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Scholarly collaboration between Europe and Israel: A scientometric examination of a changing landscape'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this