Role‐playing techniques: The differential effect of behavior simulation interventions on the readiness to inflict pain

David A. Kipper, Dov Har‐Even

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Investigated the differential effect of two kinds of behavior simulation (roleplaying) interventions: The spontaneous and the mimetic‐pretend, on the readiness and the responsibility attributions associated with delivering electric shocks to others (N = 25). Shocks were administered in a teaching situation using the Buss Aggression Machine in the “teacher‐learner” paradigm. The results showed that the spontaneous Ss were more ego‐oriented and more inhibited in administering shocks than the mimetic‐pretend Ss. Unlike the latter Ss, who evinced task‐oriented behavior and attributions, the spontaneous Ss assurned personal responsibility for their actions and evaluated the outcomes by minimizing their contribution. Implications for clinical use of role‐playing are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)936-941
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1984

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