Relative abundances of benthic foraminifera in response to total organic carbon in sediments: Data from European intertidal areas and transitional waters

Vincent M.P. Bouchet, Fabrizio Frontalini, Fabio Francescangeli, Pierre Guy Sauriau, Emmanuelle Geslin, Maria Virginia Alves Martins, Ahuva Almogi-Labin, Simona Avnaim-Katav, Letizia Di Bella, Alejandro Cearreta, Rodolfo Coccioni, Ashleigh Costelloe, Margarita D. Dimiza, Luciana Ferraro, Kristin Haynert, Michael Martínez-Colón, Romana Melis, Magali Schweizer, Maria V. Triantaphyllou, Akira TsujimotoBrent Wilson, Eric Armynot du Châtelet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

We gathered total organic carbon (%) and relative abundances of benthic foraminifera in intertidal areas and transitional waters from the English Channel/European Atlantic Coast (587 samples) and the Mediterranean Sea (301 samples) regions from published and unpublished datasets. This database allowed to calculate total organic carbon optimum and tolerance range of benthic foraminifera in order to assign them to ecological groups of sensitivity. Optima and tolerance range were obtained by mean of the weighted-averaging method. The data are related to the research article titled “Indicative value of benthic foraminifera for biomonitoring: assignment to ecological groups of sensitivity to total organic carbon of species from European intertidal areas and transitional waters” [1].

Original languageEnglish
Article number106920
JournalData in Brief
Volume35
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Authors

Keywords

  • English channel
  • European atlantic coast
  • Intertidal areas
  • Living Benthic foraminifera
  • Mediterranean sea
  • Relative abundances
  • Total organic carbon
  • Transitional waters

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