Recent advances and challenges in the development of advanced positive electrode materials for sustainable Na-ion batteries

Yuvashri Jayamkondan, Tirupathi Rao Penki, Prasant Kumar Nayak

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

As there is growing energy demand, the current focus is on the development of low-cost and sustainable energy storage devices. In this regard, the development of rechargeable non-aqueous Na-ion batteries is essential owing to the high availability and economic merits of sodium as compared to lithium. Conventional sodiated transition metal-based oxides NaxMO2 (M = Mn, Ni, Fe, and their combinations) have been considered attractive positive electrode materials for Na-ion batteries based on redox activity of transition metals and exhibit a limited capacity of around 160 mAh/g. Introducing the anionic redox activity-based charge compensation is an effective way to improve the specific capacity and specific energy of transition metal oxides. In this review paper, we will describe recent research progress and perspective of (i) structural aspects of O3 and P2-type metal oxides, (ii) effect of metal oxide synthesis and morphology on the electrochemical performance, (iii) valorization of energy density by introducing the anionic redox activity, (iv) charge storage mechanism and structural evolution during cycling, (v) electrochemical performance of bi-phasic layered oxides, (vi) development of full Na-ion cells involving various oxide cathodes, and (vii) conclusion.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101360
JournalMaterials Today Energy
Volume36
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2023
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • Anionic redox
  • Biphasic oxides
  • Metal oxide-based cathodes
  • SIB
  • Structural evolution
  • Synthesis methods

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