Quality of life between the hammer and the anvil: Challenges of living with a disability in areas of protracted political conflict

Yael Karni-Visel, Dana Roth, Neveen Ali-Saleh Darawshy, Mitchell Schertz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Article 11 of the United Nations' Convention for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and various relevant humanitarian actors recognize the obligation to ensure the protection and safety of persons with disabilities in various situations of risk, including armed and political conflict. Nonetheless, protracted crises exacerbate the existing inequalities and vulnerabilities of individuals with disabilities. This article suggests that, in addition to recognized subcultural issues, the political context should be considered in the policies and practices concerning those with disabilities. To assist individuals with disabilities and their families who are living in situations of protracted political conflict and the professionals who serve them, research should further explore these issues and their effects in terms of quality-of-life measures. A better understanding of the individual, organizational, and social contextual factors of political conflict in the conceptualization and measurement of the quality of life of individuals with disabilities and their families will promote improved and more sensitive services, support, and interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere12472
JournalJournal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Wiley Periodicals LLC.

Keywords

  • UNCRPD
  • intellectual disabilities
  • protracted political conflict
  • quality of life
  • war

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