Predictors of Involvement and Warmth of Custodial Fathers in Israel: Comparison with Married and Noncustodial Divorced Fathers

Ricky Finzi-Dottan, Orna Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study compared the levels and predictors of paternal warmth and involvement of 218 custodial fathers to 222 married fathers and 105 noncustodial (NC) divorced fathers in Israel. The examined predictors were fathers' perceptions of their own fathers; their own caregiving behaviors and parental self-efficacy; and child characteristics and coparental coordination. Results indicated that being a custodial father was associated with more involvement than being a married or NC divorced father. Regression analyses revealed that experience of care with own father predicted fathers' involvement, whereas own father control was related to lower paternal warmth. Lower avoidant caregiving and high paternal self-efficacy predicted both paternal involvement and warmth, whereas perceiving the child as more difficult predicted lower paternal warmth. Higher levels of coparental coordination were associated with more paternal involvement, whereas low coparental coordination was associated with less involvement, primarily among NC divorced fathers. These interactions highlight the distinct paternal behavior of custodial fathers. Unlike married and NC divorced fathers, they showed more warmth, regardless of their avoidant caregiving. Results are discussed in light of the different roles played by fathers in the three groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)171-187
Number of pages17
JournalFamily Process
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2016

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Family Process Institute.

Keywords

  • Caregiving
  • Child Characteristics
  • Father Involvement
  • Fatherly Warmth
  • Paternal Self-efficacy

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