Predicting changes in PTSD and depression among female intimate partner violence survivors during shelter residency: A longitudinal study.

Omer Shaked, Rachel Dekel, Anat Ben-Porat, Haya Itzhaky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Clinical Impact Statement—Many women are forced to cope with partner violence. When the violence is severe, they often have to deal with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression as well, which are coinciding consequences of the violence. During therapy, changes in both PTSD and depression can occur, but these changes are entwined with one another. Therefore, therapists need to be mindful of both PTSD and depression together. Therapists are also advised to plan a culturally sensitive therapy that takes into consideration culture-specific nuances and emotional expressions that surely color the experiences of these survivors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)349-358
Number of pages10
JournalPsychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 American Psychological Association American Psychological Association

Keywords

  • IPV
  • PTSD
  • depression
  • longitudinal study
  • shelters

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