Population structure of Erysiphe necator on domesticated and wild vines in the Middle East raises questions on the origin of the grapevine powdery mildew pathogen

Lior Gur, Moshe Reuveni, Yigal Cohen, Lance Cadle-Davidson, Breanne Kisselstein, Shmuel Ovadia, Omer Frenkel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Plant pathogens usually originate and diversify in geographical regions where hosts and pathogens co-evolve. Erysiphe necator, the causal agent of grape powdery mildew, is a destructive pathogen of grapevines worldwide. Although Eastern US is considered the centre of origin and diversity of E. necator, previous reports on resistant native wild and domesticated Asian grapevines suggest Asia as another possible origin of the pathogen. By using multi-locus sequencing, microsatellites and a novel application of amplicon sequencing (AmpSeq), we show that the population of E. necator in Israel is composed of three genetic groups: Groups A and B that are common worldwide, and a new group IL, which is genetically differentiated from any known group in Europe and Eastern US. Group IL showed distinguished ecological characteristics: it was dominant on wild and traditional vines (95%); its abundance increased along the season; and was more aggressive than A and B isolates on both wild and domesticated vines. The low genetic diversity within group IL suggests that it has invaded Israel from another origin. Therefore, we suggest that the Israeli E. necator population was founded by at least two invasions, of which one could be from a non-East American source, possibly from Asian origin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6019-6037
Number of pages19
JournalEnvironmental Microbiology
Volume23
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Funding

The authors thank Dr. Tirza Zahavi, Prof. Michael Milgroom for contributing DNA, Dr. Noa Sela and Dr. Stefan Laurent for statistic consultation, and the Israel Nature and National Parks Protection Authority for the permission to collect leaves and berries of . . This study was supported by research grant No. 3‐14704 from the Ministry of Science and Technology, Israel. V sylvestris The authors thank Dr. Tirza Zahavi, Prof. Michael Milgroom for contributing DNA, Dr. Noa Sela and Dr. Stefan Laurent for statistic consultation, and the Israel Nature and National Parks Protection Authority for the permission to collect leaves and berries of V. sylvestris. This study was supported by research grant No. 3-14704 from the Ministry of Science and Technology, Israel.

FundersFunder number
Israel Nature and National Parks Protection Authority3‐14704
Ministry of science and technology, Israel

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