Perceptions and attitudes to sexual harassment: An examination of sex differences and the sex composition of the harasser-target dyad

Mally Shechory Bitton, Danit Ben Shaul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines the role of sex in determining attitudes toward sexual harassment (SH) and perceptions of SH, and studies the extent to which attitudes toward SH predict perceptions of SH by sex. All informants (146 men and 160 women) completed three questionnaires: personal information; perceptions of SH, including cases with variations on the perpetrators and victims' sex; and attitudes toward SH, with a male, female, or unspecified victim. The findings point to significant sex differences in the perception of behaviors as SH. Women were less tolerant of SH regardless of the victim's sex. In all cases, less tolerant attitudes toward SH predicted a stronger perception of behaviors as manifesting SH. In addition, women tended to perceive male harasser/male target behaviors as SH more than men.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2136-2145
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume43
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013

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