Perceived emotional intelligence is impaired and associated with poor community functioning in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

Naomi T. Tabak, Michael F. Green, Jonathan K. Wynn, Greg H. Proudfit, Lori Altshuler, William P. Horan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have been associated with shared and distinct emotion processing abnormalities. Initial findings indicate that these disorders differ with respect to the domain of emotional intelligence (EI). Individuals with schizophrenia display deficits on performance measures of EI, whereas those with bipolar disorder do not. However, no research has examined patients' subjective beliefs about their own EI (referred to as "perceived EI"). This study examined perceived EI, assessed with the Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS), and its clinical and functional correlates in outpatients with schizophrenia (n = 35) or bipolar disorder I (n = 38) and matched healthy controls (n = 35). The TMMS includes three subscales that assess beliefs about one's ability to attend to (Attention to Feelings), understand (Clarity of Feelings), and repair emotions (Mood Repair). Participants in the clinical groups also completed community functioning and symptom assessments. Both clinical groups reported significantly lower perceived EI than controls, but did not differ from each other. Higher total TMMS correlated with higher levels of independent living in the schizophrenia group (r = .36) and better social functioning in the bipolar group (r = .61). In addition, although higher Attention to Feelings scores correlated with greater psychiatric symptoms in the schizophrenia group, higher scores across all subscales correlated with less manic symptoms in the bipolar group. The findings suggest that perceived EI is impaired and related to community functioning in both disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-195
Number of pages7
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume162
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2015
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2014.

Funding

Support for this study came from NIMH Grants MH091468 (William P. Horan, Ph.D.) and MH065707 and MH43292 (Michael F. Green, PhD). A postdoctoral fellowship for the first author was supported by an NIMH training grant in Cognitive and Affective Dysfunctions in the Psychoses at the University of California, Los Angeles (T32MH09668). The authors wish to thank Amanda Bender, Michelle Dolinsky, Crystal Gibson, Cory Tripp, and Katherine Weiner for assistance in data collection. Funding for the current study was provided by NIMH Grants MH091468 (William P. Horan, Ph.D.) and MH065707 and MH43292 (Michael F. Green, PhD).

FundersFunder number
National Institute of Mental HealthMH43292, MH091468, F31MH009668, MH065707
University of California, Los AngelesT32MH09668

    Keywords

    • Bipolar disorder
    • Emotion
    • Emotional intelligence
    • Schizophrenia

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