Parental involvement in residential care and perceptions of their offspring's life satisfaction in residential facilities for adults with intellectual disability

Chaya Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: This study examined parental involvement in relocation and post-placement care of offspring in residential facilities for adults with intellectual disability, as well as the characteristics of residents, parents, and residential institutions and the effect of those variables on parental perceptions of their offspring's life satisfaction. Method: Seventy-one adults who had moved from their family home to a community-based residence for people with intellectual disability completed the Parental Involvement Questionnaire and the parents' form of the Lifestyle Satisfaction Scale. Results: Parents reported a high level of pre-placement involvement: selecting the current residence, visiting the prospective residence, and attending admissions committee meetings. High post-placement involvement was expressed by frequent visits to the residence and participation in social activities. Parents perceived themselves as being more involved in relocation than in post-placement care. Smaller facility size, attendance at admissions committee meetings, and full partnership in residential care were related to higher levels of perceived life satisfaction. Conclusions: Professional intervention during and after the process of relocation to a community residence can be an effective way of improving parental perceptions of their offspring's life satisfaction. From the parents' perspective, a smaller residence may ensure a better quality of life for their son or daughter.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)146-155
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005

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