Oral propranolol administration is effective for infantile hemangioma in late infancy: A retrospective cohort study

Khalaf Kridin, Nadav Pam, Reuven Bergman, Ziad Khamaysi

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11 Scopus citations

Abstract

The highest efficacy of oral propranolol is for infantile hemangioma (IH) in the proliferative phase. Evaluation of the effectiveness of oral propranolol is less established when it is administered in late infancy following the proliferative phase. We aimed to assess the clinical outcomes of pediatric patients managed by oral propranolol beyond the proliferative phase of IH. A retrospective cohort study in a tertiary health care referral center was conducted to track all patients with IH receiving systemic propranolol following the proliferative phase. Twenty-eight eligible patients were managed by 2 to 3 mg/kg per day of oral propranolol for IH beyond the proliferative phase, defined at 9 months of age. The mean age at the initiation of propranolol was estimated at 11.25 (SD 2.24) months. All eligible patients experienced some degree of clinical resolution, with the average improvement rate being estimated at 77.1% (SD 16.1). Comparable results were achieved among patients who were placed on propranolol at an age older than 12 months and those managed between the age of 9 and 12 months. No serious adverse events were observed during the follow-up duration. In conclusion, oral propranolol is a safe and effective treatment for patients with IH initiating this agent beyond the proliferative phase.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13331
JournalDermatologic Therapy
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2020
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC.

Keywords

  • infantile hemangioma
  • late infancy
  • postproliferative
  • propranolol

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