Nursing aides’ mentalization, expressed emotion, and observed interaction with residents with dementia: A quasi-experimental study

Liora Cohen, Efrat Sher-Censor, David Oppenheim, Ayelet Dassa, Liat Ayalon, Yuval Palgi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the associations between nursing aides’ mentalization, expressed emotion, and observed sensitivity towards their residents with dementia. The study also explored whether nursing aides’ mentalization and expressed emotion are relational constructs that vary with residents’ characteristics and behavior. To assess mentalization and expressed emotion (i.e., criticism and positive comments), twenty nursing aides provided “Three Minutes Speech Samples” regarding two residents, one nominated by the head nurse as “difficult”, and one nominated as “easy”. Next, nursing aides were videotaped interacting with each of the two residents to assess their sensitivity and residents’ engagement. Findings indicated that nursing aides’ mentalization and positive comments were associated with their sensitivity. Nursing aides’ mentalization and positive comments did not vary with residents’ “easy” versus “difficult” nominations, but they were associated with residents’ engagement. Results suggest training and supervision programs should involve efforts to improve nursing aides' mentalization skills and their ability to perceive their residents positively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-107
Number of pages8
JournalGeriatric Nursing
Volume45
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Elsevier Inc.

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • Expressed Emotion
  • Long-term care
  • Mentalization
  • Nursing aides

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Nursing aides’ mentalization, expressed emotion, and observed interaction with residents with dementia: A quasi-experimental study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this