Not for kids: 2nd grade school children require more practice than adults to attain long-term gains in a graphomotor task

Rafat Ghanamah, Hazar Eghbaria-Ghanamah, Esther Adi-Japha, Avi Karni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

We extended the results of a previous study suggesting that although practice in a grapho-motor task by 7- to 8-year-olds led to gains in within-session performance, no long-term gains were achieved. We then compared practice dose effects on learning and retaining the grapho-motor skill in 55 7- to 8-year-olds and in 57 young adults (18–34 years old). Participants practiced the production of an artificial letter by connecting dots. In both children and adults, 6-blocks of practice (15 letter iterations per block) led to gains in speed and accuracy. However, young adults showed retention overnight and additional gains at 4–5 weeks post-training, while the children's performance returned to baseline levels. Doubling the practice dose to12-blocks resulted in speed and accuracy gains that were retained in both age groups. Thus, 7- to 8-year-olds may require larger doses of practice than young adults to trigger long-term, how-to memory for grapho-motor skills.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101246
JournalCognitive Development
Volume64
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Elsevier Inc.

Keywords

  • Developmental differences
  • Invented letter task
  • Long-term retention
  • Practice protocol
  • Skill

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Not for kids: 2nd grade school children require more practice than adults to attain long-term gains in a graphomotor task'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this