Naming difficulties in language-disabled children: Preliminary findings with the application of the tip-of-the-tongue paradigm

Miriam Faust, Lilly Dimitrovsky, Shira Davidi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

The 'tip of the tongue' (TOT) paradigm in a picture-naming task was presented to 14 children with language disabilities (LD) and 14 children without language disabilities (ND). Although the two groups did not differ in the semantic information they had on words they could not fully retrieve, the LD children had less valid and more invalid phonological information. They also had fewer correct responses and spontaneous recalls, more 'Don't Know's (DK) and TOTs, and less accurate 'feeling of knowing' (FOK) judgments. These results, demonstrating dissociation between the semantic and phonological levels of word representation, support a two-stage model of word retrieval. These findings are evidence in favor of a phonological treatment approach for naming problems in LD children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1026-1036
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1997

Keywords

  • Feeling of knowing (FOK)
  • Language-disabled children
  • Naming
  • TOT state

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