Multicentric intraepithelial neoplasia involving the vulva. Clinical features and association with human papillomavirus and herpes simplex virus

Jacob Bornstein, Raymond H. Kaufman, Ervin Adam, Karen Adler‐Storthz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sixteen of 46 patients (35%) with Grade 3 vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN 3) were found to have an additional site of lower genital tract squamous cell neoplasia, primarily in the cervix. The frequency of multicentricity decreased significantly with age. In addition, patients with multicentric disease (involving the vagina and/or cervix in addition to the vulva) had a significantly higher frequency of multifocal disease involving the vulva (involving more than one location on the vulva) and of recurrence than patients without multicentric disease. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA was detected by in situ hybridization in 81% of the women with multicentric squamous cell neoplasia. No significant difference was noticed between patients with multicentric and unicentric squamous cell neoplasia in the detection rate of papillomavirus antigen, HPV DNA, the various HPV types, herpes simplex virus Type 2 (HSV2)‐related antigen, type specific antibodies to HSV, and dual HPV and HSV2 infections. These findings suggest that HPV and HSV2, although strongly associated with VIN 3, do not influence the development pattern of squamous cell neoplasia, and that all patients with VIN 3, especially if they are younger than 50 years of age, should be evaluated periodically for additional centers of lower genital tract squamous cell neoplasia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1601-1604
Number of pages4
JournalCancer
Volume62
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Oct 1988
Externally publishedYes

Funding

FundersFunder number
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial ResearchR01DE007008

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