Miniaturized, 0.01 mm2, Resistor-Based Thermal Sensor with an Energy Consumption of 0.9 nJ and a Conversion Time of 80 μs for Processor Applications

Anatoli Mordakhay, Joseph Shor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Thermal sensing is a key power management feature in microprocessor products and other integrated circuits. There can be as many as 40 sensors on a chip. Thus, it is important for these sensors to have a highly compact area, as well as low energy. In this paper, we report a novel resistor-based thermal sensor with an area of 0.01 mm2 in 65-nm process, an energy consumption of 0.9 nJ/conversion, and a conversion speed of 80 μ This sensor is one of the smallest, fastest, and lowest energy sensors reported which utilize resistors as the sensing element, making it optimal for CPU applications. The sensor has a competitive resolution figure of merit of 0.02 nJ · K2, as well as a relative inaccuracy of 1.4 °C, which easily meets the accuracy requirements of these applications. The circuit architecture is based on the measurement of an RC time constant using a novel amplifier/comparator circuit, along with a dynamic bias for power savings.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8445659
Pages (from-to)2958-2969
Number of pages12
JournalIEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits
Volume53
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 1966-2012 IEEE.

Keywords

  • CMOS temperature sensor
  • Calibration
  • resistor-based sensor
  • temperature compensation

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