Memory outcomes following cognitive interventions in children with neurological deficits: A review with a focus on under-studied populations

Yael Schaffer, Ronny Geva

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Given the primary role of memory in children's learning and well-being, the aim of this review was to examine the outcomes of memory remediation interventions in children with neurological deficits as a function of the affected memory system and intervention method. Fifty-seven studies that evaluated the outcome of memory interventions in children were identified. Thirty-four studies met the inclusion criteria, and were included in a systematic review. Diverse rehabilitation methods for improving explicit and implicit memory in children were reviewed. The analysis indicates that teaching restoration strategies may improve, and result in the generalisation of, semantic memory and working memory performance in children older than 7 years with mild to moderate memory deficits. Factors such as longer protocols, emotional support, and personal feedback contribute to intervention efficacy. In addition, the use of compensation aids seems to be highly effective in prospective memory tasks. Finally, the review unveiled a lack of studies with young children and the absence of group interventions. These findings point to the importance of future evidence-based intervention protocols in these areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)286-317
Number of pages32
JournalNeuropsychological Rehabilitation
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 3 Mar 2016

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 Taylor & Francis.

Keywords

  • Compensation
  • Memory
  • Paediatric
  • Rehabilitation
  • Restoration

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