Magnetic stimulation and the crossed-uncrossed difference (CUD) paradigm: Selective effects in the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres

Tzu Ching Chiang, Michal Lavidor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

When a visual target is presented to one hemifield, manual responses made to the target using the ipsilateral hand (uncrossed responses) are faster than responses using the contralateral hand (crossed response), because there is no need for visuomotor information to be transferred between the hemispheres. This difference in response times is termed the crossed-uncrossed difference (CUD) and is a valuable means of estimating interhemispheric transfer time. We aimed to investigate the CUD by applying repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the left and right occipital cortex during a lateralized target-detection task. Eleven neurologically healthy subjects, all right-handed, participated in the study. Relative to sham TMS we increased the CUD, by inhibiting the crossed latencies, but only when rTMS was applied to the hemisphere receiving visual information. These results replicate and extend previous findings and suggest the inhibitory rTMS effect under the crossed condition might be because the weak visual output is unable to activate the crossed pathway.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)404-408
Number of pages5
JournalExperimental Brain Research
Volume160
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2005
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgments This study was supported by the Royal Society, The Wellcome Trust (ICN), the European Commission, and a BBSRC research grant (M. Lavidor). We wish to thank Vincent Walsh for his helpful comments.

Keywords

  • Interhemispheric transfer
  • Occipital cortex
  • Poffenberger paradigm
  • Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)

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