Long-term mental health of men after a first acute myocardial infarction

Yaacov Drory, Shlomo Kravetz, Gilad Hirschberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the differential and independent impact of sociodemographic, medical, and psychologic variables assessed at hospital discharge on patients' short- and long-term mental health. Design: Longitudinal study. Setting: Eight medical centers in central Israel. Participants: Male Israeli patients (N = 209; age range: 30-65y) with documented first acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Intervention: Subjects were interviewed 3 times, once (T1) before hospital discharge, a second time (T2) at 3 to 6 months after discharge, and a third time (T3) at 5 years post-AMI. Sociodemographic, medical, and psychologic data were elicited at the first interview and completed with medical information in the files. Psychologic well-being and psychologic distress were evaluated by the Mental Health Inventory at the second and third interviews. These 2 outcome variables were compared with normative community data on these aspects of mental health. Main Outcome Measures: Hierarchical regression was used to examine the relation between the independent variables, sociodemographic, medical, and psychologic variables, and the dependent variables, psychologic well-being and psychologic distress, at T2 and T3. Results: Depression, perceived health, sense of coherence, social support, and educational level at discharge predicted aspects of mental health 3 to 6 months and 5 years post-AMI. However, only psychologic distress differentiated between the research participants and the normative community sample of men. Conclusions: A first episode of AMI appears to increase psychologic distress more than it decreases psychologic well-being both 3 to 6 months and 5 years post-AMI. Educational level and sense of coherence may serve as protective factors, whereas depression may foster vulnerability to distress and impaired psychologic well-being.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)352-359
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume83
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2002
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Supported in part by the Head Scientist of the Israel Ministry of Health, the National Insurance Institute, the Administrator General of the Israel Ministry of Justice, the Committee for Research and Prevention in Occupational Safety and Health of the Israel Ministry of Labor and Welfare, the Tel-Aviv University Research Fund, and the Edith and Israel Pollak Foundation, Tel-Aviv.

Funding

Supported in part by the Head Scientist of the Israel Ministry of Health, the National Insurance Institute, the Administrator General of the Israel Ministry of Justice, the Committee for Research and Prevention in Occupational Safety and Health of the Israel Ministry of Labor and Welfare, the Tel-Aviv University Research Fund, and the Edith and Israel Pollak Foundation, Tel-Aviv.

FundersFunder number
Ministry of Health, State of Israel
National Insurance Institute
Edith and Israel Pollak Foundation
Committee for Research and Prevention in Occupational Safety and Health of the Israel Ministry of Labor and Welfare
Tel-Aviv
Tel Aviv University
Administrator General of the Israel Ministry of Justice

    Keywords

    • Mental health
    • Myocardial infarction
    • Rehabilitation
    • Stress, psychological

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