Local and global fairness in concurrent systems

Alon Brook, Doron Peled, Sven Schewe

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Concurrency theory suggests the use of fairness as a criterion for a reasonable execution: a transition or a process should not wait an unbounded amount of time to execute if it is enabled continuously (under weak fairness) or infinitely often (under strong fairness). Unlike multiprocessing, in actual concurrent systems one may rely on the physical nature of the system to act in a 'fair' manner. However, in many realistic concurrent systems, performing the next transition may involve several smaller steps that can include negotiation and communication, and fairness can be hard to achieve. It is useful to be able to control the global fairness guaranteed by enforcing local constraints on processes. We define local fairness conditions and study their relationship with common notions of global fairness constraints.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2015 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Formal Methods and Models for Codesign, MEMOCODE 2015
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages2-9
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781509002375
DOIs
StatePublished - 30 Nov 2015
EventACM/IEEE International Conference on Formal Methods and Models for Codesign, MEMOCODE 2015 - Austin, United States
Duration: 21 Sep 201523 Sep 2015

Publication series

Name2015 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Formal Methods and Models for Codesign, MEMOCODE 2015

Conference

ConferenceACM/IEEE International Conference on Formal Methods and Models for Codesign, MEMOCODE 2015
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityAustin
Period21/09/1523/09/15

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 IEEE.

Keywords

  • Automata
  • Computer science
  • Control systems
  • Electronic mail
  • Probabilistic logic
  • Process control
  • Synchronization

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