Is the term "savar" in the babylonian talmud ever used to indicate an opinion that is not ultimately rejected?

Mordechai Sabato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The term "savar"in the Babylonian Talmud indicates an opinion that is ultimately rejected. According to some Rishonim, however, in certain places this term introduces an opinion that is not rejected. This article examines these instances and concludes that indeed in these places the term "savar"is references an opinion that is not ultimately rejected. In most of these places, the reading in most of the textual witnesses was emended, and the word "savar"was erased, apparently in accordance with the other approach. In those places where the text was not emended, some of the commentators interpreted the passage not in accordance with its plain meaning, and, according to their interpretation, the opinion that was introduced by the "savar"was indeed rejected.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-206
Number of pages24
JournalReview of Rabbinic Judaism
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2020.

Keywords

  • Babylonian Talmud
  • Rabbinic terminology
  • Savar

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