Introducing technology into medical education: Two pilot studies

Paul George, Luba Dumenco, Richard Dollase, Julie Scott Taylor, Hedy S. Wald, Shmuel P. Reis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Educators are integrating new technology into medical curriculum. The impact of newer technology on educational outcomes remains unclear. We aimed to determine if two pilot interventions, (1) introducing iPads into problem-based learning (PBL) sessions and (2) online tutoring would improve the educational experience of our learners. Methods: We voluntarily assigned 26 second-year medical students to iPad-based PBL sessions. Five students were assigned to Skype for exam remediation. We performed a mixed-method evaluation to determine efficacy. Results: Pilot 1: Seventeen students completed a survey following their use of an iPad during the second-year PBL curriculum. Students noted the iPad allows for researching information in real time, annotating lecture notes, and viewing sharper images. Data indicate that iPads have value in medical education and are a positive addition to the curriculum. Pilot 2: Students agreed that online tutoring is at least or more effective than in-person tutoring. Conclusions: In our pilot studies, students experienced that iPads and Skype are beneficial in medical education and can be successfully employed in areas such as PBL and remediation. Practice implications: Educators should continue to further examine innovative opportunities for introducing technology into medical education.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)522-524
Number of pages3
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume93
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

Keywords

  • Problem-based learning
  • Program evaluation
  • Technology
  • Undergraduate medical education

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