Interkingdom Signaling Interference: The Effect of Plant-Derived Small Molecules on Quorum Sensing in Plant-Pathogenic Bacteria

Janak Raj Joshi, Netaly Khazanov, Amy Charkowski, Adi Faigenboim, Hanoch Senderowitz, Iris Yedidia

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the battle between bacteria and plants, bacteria often use a population density-dependent regulatory system known as quorum sensing (QS) to coordinate virulence gene expression. In response, plants use innate and induced defense mechanisms that include low-molecular-weight compounds, some of which serve as antivirulence agents by interfering with the QS machinery. The best-characterized QS system is driven by the autoinducer N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL), which is produced by AHL synthases (LuxI homologs) and perceived by response regulators (LuxR homologs). Several plant compounds have been shown to directly inhibit LuxI or LuxR. Gaining atomic-level insight into their mode of action and how they interfere with QS enzymes supports the identification and design of novel QS inhibitors. Such information can be gained by combining experimental work with molecular modeling and docking simulations. The summary of these findings shows that plant-derived compounds act as interkingdom cues and that these allomones specifically target bacterial communication systems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-190
Number of pages38
JournalAnnual Review of Phytopathology
Volume59
DOIs
StatePublished - 25 Aug 2021

Bibliographical note

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Copyright © 2021 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Bacterial virulence
  • Inhibitors
  • LuxI-LuxR
  • Plant compounds
  • Quorum sensing interference

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