Intergroup relations and the attribution of emotions: Control over memory for secondary emotions associated with the ingroup and outgroup

Ruth Gaunt, Jacques Philippe Leyens, Stéphanie Demoulin

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77 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study tested the hypothesis that people perceive their ingroup as experiencing more uniquely human secondary emotions than the outgroup. Jacoby's process-dissociation procedure was used to measure participants' controlled recognition memory for materials that associated the ingroup or outgroup with secondary or primary emotions. Conscious memory was better for associations between the outgroup and secondary emotions than for associations between the ingroup and secondary emotions. No such difference was found for primary emotions. These results suggest that people attribute more humanity to the ingroup than to the outgroup.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)508-514
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2002

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by Grant ARC 96/01.198 of the Communauté française de Belgique. We thank Magdalena Mozdzierz for her assistance in collecting data. We are grateful to Olivier Corneille for his invaluable comments and thoughtful advice on various stages of this project.

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