Interaction between Electrolytes and Sb2O3-Based Electrodes in Sodium Batteries: Uncovering the Detrimental Effects of Diglyme

Kristina Pfeifer, Miryam Fayena Greenstein, Doron Aurbach, Xianlin Luo, Helmut Ehrenberg, Sonia Dsoke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Conversion materials are promising to improve the energy density of sodium-ion-batteries (NIB). Nevertheless, they suffer from the drawback of phase transitions and pronounced volume changes during cycling, which causes cell instability. When using these types of electrodes, all cell-components have to be adjusted. In this study, a tremendous influence of the electrolyte solution on Sb2O3 conversion electrodes for NIBs is discussed. Solutions based on three solvents and solvent combinations established for NIBs, ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbonate (EC/DMC), EC/DMC+5 % fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC), and diglyme, lead to a massively divergent electrochemical behavior of the same Sb2O3 electrode. Sb2O3 demonstrates the highest stability in solutions containing FEC, because this component forms a flexible, protecting surface film that prevent disintegration. One key finding of this work is that electrolyte solutions based on ether solvents like diglyme can remove Sb-ions from Sb2O3 during cycling. Diglyme has the ability to coordinate and extract Sb3+ during the oxidation of Sb2O3. This leads to contaminations of all cell components and a strong capacity loss together with an irregular electrochemical signature. Due to its poor reactivity at low potentials, diglyme forms a thin or even no surface layer. Thereby, there are no protecting films on the Sb2O3 electrodes that can avoid Sb3+ ion dissolution. A critical examination of the electrolyte solutions components’ impact is essential to match them with conversion reaction anodes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3487-3495
Number of pages9
JournalChemElectroChem
Volume7
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - 17 Aug 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH GmbH

Funding

The authors thank Dr. A. Sarapulova, Dr. M. Widmaier, M. Bauer, and C. Li for support and helpful discussions. This work contributes to the research performed at CELEST (Center for Electrochemical Energy Storage Ulm-Karlsruhe) and was funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) under Project ID 390874152 (POLiS Cluster of Excellence). We further thank Thomas Bergfeldt and the IAM-AWP, Chemical Analytics Institute for conducting the ICP-MS analytics. Open access funding enabled and organized by Projekt DEAL. The authors thank Dr. A. Sarapulova, Dr. M. Widmaier, M. Bauer, and C. Li for support and helpful discussions. This work contributes to the research performed at CELEST (Center for Electrochemical Energy Storage Ulm‐Karlsruhe) and was funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) under Project ID 390874152 (POLiS Cluster of Excellence). We further thank Thomas Bergfeldt and the IAM‐AWP, Chemical Analytics Institute for conducting the ICP‐MS analytics. Open access funding enabled and organized by Projekt DEAL.

FundersFunder number
Center for Electrochemical Energy Storage Ulm-Karlsruhe
Center for Electrochemical Energy Storage Ulm‐Karlsruhe
Chemical Analytics Institute
IAM-AWP
Thomas Bergfeldt
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft390874152

    Keywords

    • Sb ions complexation
    • conversion reactions
    • diglyme
    • non-aqueous electrolyte solutions
    • sodium batteries

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