Intact visual discrimination of complex and feature-ambiguous stimuli in the absence of perirhinal cortex

Daniel A. Levy, Yael Shrager, Larry R. Squire

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

66 Scopus citations

Abstract

The perirhinal cortex is known to be important for memory, but there has recently been interest in the possibility that it might also be involved in visual perceptual functions. In four experiments, we assessed visual discrimination ability and visual discrimination learning in severely amnesic patients with large medial temporal lobe lesions that included complete lesions of perirhinal cortex. Experiment 1 tested complex visual object perception. Experiments 2a and 2b tested in two different ways the ability to discriminate between feature-ambiguous images, which was reported to be impaired in monkeys with perirhinal lesions. Experiment 3 involved images that were successfully discriminated in Experiment 2a and asked patients to learn across 20 trials which of the images had been designated as "correct." Patients performed as well as controls in Experiments 1, 2a, and 2b, but one of the patients had difficulty in Experiment 3 when the task required remembering from trial to trial which image was "correct." These findings indicate that perirhinal cortex is not needed for visual perception across a wide range of visual perceptual tasks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-66
Number of pages6
JournalLearning and Memory
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2005
Externally publishedYes

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