Insulinlike growth factor-1 inhibits cell death induced by cycloheximide in MCF-7 cells: A model system for analyzing control of cell death

A. Geier, M. Haimshon, R. Beery, R. Hemi, B. Lunenfeld

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Abstract

Prolonged exposure of cells to the potent protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide terminates in cell death. In the present study we investigated the effect of insulinlike growth factor-1, insulin, and epidermal growth factor on cell death induced by cycloheximide in the confluent MCF-7 cell, and correlated this effect to the inhibition rate of protein synthesis. Cell death was evaluated by measuring either dead cells by the trypan blue dye exclusion test or by the release of lactic dehydrogenase into the culture medium. After 48 h incubation, cycloheximide (10 to 50 μg/ml) was shown to induce cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Insulinlike growth factor-1, at physiologic concentrations (0.2 to 5 ng/ml), reduced this cell death. Insulin at supraphysiologic concentrations (1 to 10 μg/ml) mimicked the effect of insulinlike growth factor-1, whereas epidermal growth factor (10 to 50 ng/ml) had no effect. More than 90% of protein synthesis measured by [3H]leucine incorporation was inhibited by 10 to 50 μg/ml cycloheximide. Insulinlike growth factor-1 and insulin at the concentrations that reduced cell death to control level, had no effect on the protein synthesis inhibition rate induced by cycloheximide. These results indicate that inhibition of cell death by insulinlike growth factor-1 does not depend on protein synthesis and may be mediated via a posttranslational modification effect.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)725-729
Number of pages5
JournalIn Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology
Volume28 A
Issue number11-12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

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